Personal tools
You are here: Home Membership CareerNews Archives ACM CareerNews for Tuesday, March 19 , 2013
Document Actions

ACM CareerNews for Tuesday, March 19 , 2013

ACM CareerNews is intended as an objective career news digest for busy IT professionals. Views expressed are not necessarily those of ACM. To send comments, please write to careernews@hq.acm.org

Volume 9, Issue 6, March 19, 2013




 

How Big Data Is Transforming the Hunt for Talent
Forbes, March 8

Recruiters and HR departments are actively looking for ways to use Big Data effectively to find the best candidates for new openings. Until now, Big Data has been slow to penetrate the world of human resources, but that’s changing fast. HR professionals are realizing that there’s a lot of value to be created and added through data analytics, whether it’s doing a better job spotting talent outside to attract to the company, or doing predictive analysis of who is likely to leave, and why. The article takes a closer look at some of the ways Big Data is reinventing the world of recruiting and talent management.

According to experts, Big Data will lead to a reinvention of some very traditional processes in companies and a rethinking of how HR gets done. Most importantly, Big Data will require that HR decisions be underpinned by facts, making it possible to decide where the highest value will be added. For example, different analytics packages can be used to fight attrition: you can literally drill down to where it’s happening. In addition to seeing departmental or managerial hotspots, it’s possible to identify other, less obvious factors. If somebody has been in a role for three years, hasn’t been promoted, and hasn’t changed roles, there’s a far higher probability of attrition than someone who doesn’t have those circumstances. When you find the people who have that situation and go have a career conversation with them, it can keep those employees from leaving the company.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Five Ways to Job Hunt Using Facebook
CIO.com, March 4

According to the 2012 Social Job Seeker Survey, Facebook is emerging as a leading social network for job hunting. As a result, both jobseekers and recruiters are looking for new ways to use the popular social network to maximize their career opportunities. Currently, 86% of recruiters say they seek out potential candidates' social media profiles, and that percentage could increase as they learn the ins and outs of Facebook's new Graph Search. The article reviews five Facebook applications that tap into your social network to find you new career opportunities.

BranchOut, a Facebook application that launched in 2010 and has more than 30 million members, uses your Facebook network to connect on a professional level and take advantage of job opportunities. Similar to Facebook's Timeline, BranchOut features a "Professional Timeline" that uses photos, news and updates. As a result, people can bring their careers to life by showcasing the professional moments that define them. In addition, the BeKnown Facebook app taps into Monster.com's job database to give you insight into how you're connected to companies with open job positions through your Facebook friends. BeKnown fills out your professional profile with the basic information from Facebook to get you started. You can add additional achievements, claim a customized BeKnown URL and request endorsements from colleagues and classmates to highlight your professional accomplishments.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


EU Commission Launches Grand Coalition to Tackle IT Shortage
BBC News, March 5

The European Commission has launched a grand coalition to address the region's IT skills shortages. Neelie Kroes, Vice President of the European Commission, recently told CeBIT attendees that the EU's future competitiveness is under threat if it cannot fill the expertise gap. The shortages come at a time of high unemployment across Europe, putting even more pressure on the EU to generate greater awareness of IT career opportunities. While some high-profile companies have launched programs to entice students, there is still much to be done by the coalition, which will be financed by the European Commission. The article takes a close look at how Europe plans to fill hundreds of thousands IT job vacancies, as well as what jobs are in greatest demand.

The European Commission’s figures suggest that there will be 900,000 vacancies for IT-related roles by 2015. At the same time, there are currently about 26 million people unemployed across Europe. The number of "digital jobs" - jobs based around IT - is growing by about 100,000 every year, yet the number of skilled IT graduates is failing to keep pace. The commission highlighted several new initiatives already taking places, including Telefonica's investment in start-ups, and Cisco's pledge to train 100,000 people to install smart-meters into homes.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Health Providers Can't Find, Keep IT Staff
Computerworld, March 4

Under pressure from federal regulators to implement electronic health systems, healthcare providers are struggling to find and keep a technology staff in what is the fastest growing IT sector in the U.S. A Healthcare Information and Management Systems (HIMSS) survey of 298 senior IT executives at healthcare firms found that 21% fear they won't be able to find the tech staff needed to complete an e-health system, including a massive, new medical coding system to be deployed on new mobile technologies. It was the second year in a row that respondents to an HIMSS survey listed staffing as the biggest barrier to implementing systems that meet new U.S. healthcare technology requirements.

The HIMSS survey found that 51% of respondents plan to increase IT staff in the next year, mostly personnel that can build clinical applications, such as computer physician order entry systems and electronic health records (EHR) systems. Staffers are also needed to build clinical applications (34%) and network and architecture support (21%). 18% of respondents said clinical informatics expertise is their biggest need, while another 18% cited IT security knowledge. Rounding out the top 10 were the need for staff for system integration tasks (14%), process/workflow, PC/server support and clinical transformation (each cited by 12% of respondents), and database administration, help desk and user training (each with 10%).


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Social Media and Recruiting: Top Channels and Trends for 2013
Marketing Profs, March 11

For recruiting and staffing professionals, increased access to passive job candidates via social media presents the biggest opportunity for recruiting in 2013. Asked to identify the one factor that offers the greatest opportunity in recruiting for 2013, 47% of surveyed staffing and recruiting professionals cited increased access to passive candidates via social channels, 18% cited efficient business practices, 15% cited increases in flexible roles and working environments, and 7% cited untapped growth in emerging economies. The survey results are from the North American Staffing and Recruiting Trends report, issued by Bullhorn in February 2013.

Among the recruiters surveyed, nearly all (98%) say they used social media for recruiting in 2012, up from the 94% who did so in 2011. Among those using social media for recruiting, LinkedIn was the most popular channel (97%), followed by Facebook (51%) and Twitter (49%). LinkedIn was also the most effective channel for recruiting: 93% of recruiters say they used the professional networking site to successfully place a candidate 2012, up from the 86% who said so a year earlier. Also, 17% of recruiters used Facebook to place a candidate in 2012 (vs. 19% in 2011), and 13% used Twitter (vs. 10% in 2011).


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Demand for IT Security Experts Outstrips Supply
CIO.com (via Computerworld), March 7

Demand for information security experts in the United States is outpacing the available supply by a widening margin. A new report from Burning Glass Technologies, for example, shows that demand for information security professionals over the past five years grew 3.5 times faster than demand for other IT jobs and about 12 times faster than for all other jobs. In 2012, there were more than 67,400 separate postings for information security-related jobs in a range of industries, including defense, financial services, retail, healthcare and professional services. This total is 73% higher than the number of security jobs posted in 2007. By comparison, the number of job postings for all computer jobs grew by about 20% between 2007 and 2012.

The two most sought-after IT security jobs by employers were information security engineers and security analysts. Nearly one in three of all computer security jobs advertised last year were for information security engineers. Nearly 25% of the job postings were for security analysts. Demand for IT security professionals was especially strong in Baltimore, Dallas, Atlanta, Denver, San Diego, and Richmond: the number of cyber security jobs in each of those cities increased by more than 100% between 2007 and 2012. Large defense contractors and IT firms appear to have driven much of this demand increase. The soaring demand for information security professionals suggests that enterprises and government agencies are putting a lot more money and effort into protecting their data against attacks and compromise.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science and Tech?
Fortune, March 11

At a time when Silicon Valley executives like Sheryl Sandberg are pushing for more women to advance their careers, there are still too few women in science and technology. Despite the fact that women hold 60% of all bachelor’s degrees and comprise 48% of the overall workforce, they only hold about 20% of all computer science jobs and approximately 15% of all engineering jobs. When it comes to the executive suite, the numbers are even tinier – only 7% of CIOs are women. So what can be done to help close that gap? Karen Purcell, the founder of STEMspire, a nonprofit organization that offers scholarships to female STEM students, weighs in with her thoughts on why there are still so few women in these careers, and what it will take to change that.

As Karen Purcell notes, it matters that women are not pursuing STEM careers. First, women themselves are missing out on great opportunities by not going into these fields. The Department of Commerce is predicting that STEM job openings will grow 17% by 2018, a much faster rate than most other careers. And these are among the highest-paying fields too, in part because of that rising demand. But beyond that, in very practical terms, the shortage of women leads to problems like mistakes in product design that do not account for the needs of women. Purcell suggests that the “gender gap” starts very early, when girls in middle school and high school start getting subtle messages that math and science are for boys. Even though plenty of research shows that girls do just as well as boys on standardized math tests, there is this unintentional bias among parents and educators that pushes boys toward science and math, and nudges girls away.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


IT Age Discrimination: You’re Not the Dinosaur
Information Week, March 12

Are big companies tailoring their hiring and layoff practices to replace senior IT staffers with less expensive ones, or are older IT employees simply failing to keep their skills current? According to some within the tech industry, age discrimination has become an “open secret” – and one that is potentially leading organizations to make decisions about hiring and firing that are based more on the bottom line than on attracting and retaining the best talent. If that’s the case at your company or organization, you should start to look for new opportunities as soon as possible. Good employers will help transition IT workers to other areas of the organization – the ones that don’t are at a competitive disadvantage against those that do.

Unfortunately, the data suggests that many IT employers actively engage in age discrimination tactics. For example, one critic suggest that some Silicon Valley employers limit hiring to new or recent graduates (essentially freezing out people over age 35) and then use the U.S. H-1B visa program to hire young foreign workers. By claiming there is an IT skills shortage, these employers hope to expand the H-1B visa program even more, so that they can keep down salary and benefits. Another critic points out that more than two-thirds of employer H-1B petitions in fiscal year 2011 (the latest year for which there's data) were for workers age 25 to 34. Only 9.8% of petitions were for workers 40 and older. The IEEE has tracked member employment since at least 1999, and at least from a perception standpoint, age has ranked No. 1 in "barriers to re-employment." The data shows that across professions, for each additional year of age the delay between unemployment and re-employment increases.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Goldwasser, Micali Receive ACM Turing Award for Advances in Cryptography
ACM Press Room, March 13

Shafi Goldwasser, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, and Silvio Micali, also a professor of engineering at MIT, received the 2012 ACM Turing Award for their breakthrough ideas on cryptography. Working together, they pioneered the field of provable security, which laid the mathematical foundations that made modern cryptography possible. By formalizing the concept that cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute, they created mathematical structures that turned cryptography from an art into a science. Their work addresses important practical problems such as the protection of data from being viewed or modified, providing a secure means of communications and transactions over the Internet.

The ACM Turing Award, widely considered the Nobel Prize of computing, is a way to reward theoretical ideas that have wide social impact. For example, the encryption schemes from Goldwasser and Micali can be applied to programs running in today’s Web browsers, as well as the method of encrypting credit card numbers when shopping on the Internet. Goldwasser and Micali developed cryptographic algorithms that are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice. In the computer era, these advances in cryptography have transcended the cryptography of Alan Turing’s code-breaking era to include applications for ATM cards, computer passwords, e-commerce, and electronic voting.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


A Revolution in India
Communications of the ACM, Vol. 56 No. 3, March 2013

After visiting India for a meeting of the ACM-India Council and an ACM-W India event, ACM President Vinton G. Cerf weighs in on how developments in India could impact both ACM and the broader computer science field. Cerf notes there is new momentum for ACM in India, which already has 63 student chapters and 13 professional chapters and is seeing signs of a dramatic reversal of the gender imbalance within India. As well, there is new emphasis from government officials to make IT an enhancer of job creation - whether it’s new wireless networks or new transportation infrastructure. At the same time, India continues to have a world-class program of education in computer science, engineering, and programming, thanks in large part to the government policies of India PM Rajiv Gandhi.

During his visit, Cerf met with top Indian government officials, including a Gandhi family member who is also a potential candidate to become Prime Minister as early as 2014. Cerf notes that India is likely to continue modernizing its infrastructure and applying IT in new ways to benefit the nation’s 1.2 billion citizens. For example, a massive fiber-networking program is in progress to bring high-speed networking to every village in India. Distribution to homes and businesses could be achieved with the use of wireless connectivity including 2G, 3G, and LTE as well as Wi-Fi. While the current population of Internet users is estimated at only 140 million today, there are 300 million data-capable mobiles in use and that number is bound to increase. At the same time, Internet users in villages around India are increasingly sophisticated when it comes to using the latest innovations for mobile, laptop and desktop.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top