Document Actions

ACM CareerNews for Tuesday, May 4, 2010

ACM CareerNews is intended as an objective career news digest for busy IT professionals. Views expressed are not necessarily those of ACM. To send comments, please write to careernews-request@acm.org

Volume 6, Issue 9, May 4, 2010




Top Tech Professionals Eye the U.S. for Jobs
Network World (via Computerworld UK), April 27

According to the 2010 Hydrogen Global Professionals on the Move Report, nearly one-quarter (23%) of highly skilled experienced technology professionals would like to work in the United States, followed by 16% who would like to go to Australia and 12% who would prefer to work in the UK. Other countries in the top 10 were France, Canada, Switzerland, the United Arab Emirates, Singapore, New Zealand and Germany. Factors influencing the decision of where to work abroad include language, the size of the expatriate community and overall IT infrastructure. As some geographic regions recover faster than others from the global downturn, recruiters expect to see the relative popularity of these regions reflect where the highest-paid jobs are migrating.

As the Global Professionals on the Move Report found, IT professionals are more open to working abroad when they view the move as shifting from a career focus to a project focus. Correspondingly, the top reason for respondents moving abroad was for “new experiences” (22.4%). This was followed by 20.3% of respondents who said it would be for better opportunities, while 16.4% cited better living conditions. Another 14.3% said they would work overseas if an opportunity came up with their current employer. Just 6.4% said they would work abroad because of higher pay.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Boom Times for Young Workers
Wall Street Journal, April 20

As companies adjust to operating with leaner staffs, many young professionals in their 20s and early 30s are receiving types of responsibilities typically reserved for employees with more work experience. Millennial workers are being pressured to do more for different reasons, with most of these reasons related to labor costs. Some are faced with higher-level work after surviving a round of layoffs that affected higher-ranking colleagues, while others are being asked to do more as companies rethink their business models in the recession. While it can be a stimulus to career development, handing young employees these types of roles can often lead to a difficult adjustment period both for the individual and the company.

Many young workers are finding ways to take advantage of the added exposure and are quickly building new skills in the hopes of keeping the roles they wouldn't have such fast access to in a more robust economy. Others are using the opportunity to figure out what they want to do next. It's a strategy that career experts say can pay off, especially if you can deal with the added responsibilities by learning to do extra tasks in your free time that can help you learn more about important areas. As you do so, be open with your supervisors about your goals and what positions you're interested in so that they can keep you in mind when openings arise now.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Upsurge in Executive Jobs
Management Issues, April 23

Despite the continuing downturn, the number of available executive jobs continues to expand briskly. According to ExecuNet's 2010 Executive Job Market Intelligence Report, the first several months of 2010 led to an upturn in executive job creation. The report, which is based on surveys of executives, search firm consultants and corporate HR professionals, found that one in five companies globally are creating new executive-level jobs while more than half (56%) are looking for new hires to fill existing roles. Within the U.S., certain industries and job segments are experiencing a particularly sharp increase in overall hiring demand.

The industries expected to generate the most executive job growth in 2010 are healthcare, green technology, high tech, pharmaceuticals, biotech and energy & utilities. However, few of these positions will be advertised. In fact, just one in 10 open, executive-level positions are publicly posted online and by far the best way to access these opportunities is working your network. The importance of the personal network explains another finding: while more than 80% of the executives surveyed claimed that they are committed to their organization and find their work engaging, a similar proportion would also would return calls from recruiters in hopes of building a relationship that could lead to a new position.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Federal CIOs Urge Changes to Entice IT Workers
Information Week, April 26

Federal government CIOs are pushing their agencies to adopt new workplace practices in order to remain competitive in recruiting the most talented IT workers, while simultaneously meeting ever-evolving federal IT needs. A report surveying federal IT workforce trends found that young IT workers are among the most demanding employees; however, at the same time, the federal government has been falling short in its ability to entice these young workers to join and remain in the federal workforce. These challenges come at a time when the future of the federal IT workforce is uncertain, due to changing demographics. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of the federal IT workforce is older than 45 years old, creating the very real potential for a cascade of retirements over the next decade.

Workers between the ages of 17-44 are significantly unrepresented in the federal IT workforce when compared to the general population. At the same time, the federal government will need skilled workers to maintain many of the government's aging legacy applications. As demand for and introduction of new technologies continues to increase, the IT talent pool is shrinking. Fewer students graduate with IT degrees than the job market needs, and the government has trouble paying the most demanding young employees what they might think they can earn in the private market. These young workers prefer to sample professional opportunities and move on quickly when they see no clear-cut advantages to staying.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Inside Project Managers' Paychecks: PMI Salary Survey Results
CIO.com, April 22

U.S. project managers are largely optimistic about their salaries in 2010, according to data from the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Salary Survey. Approximately two-thirds (67%) of project management professionals in the U.S. expect their salaries to improve in 2010, while 29% expect to see their wages remain constant. The optimism stems largely from their positive experiences over the past two years, when 53% of U.S. project managers earned a raise. The median base salary for a project management professional in the U.S. is $100,000, with three-fourths of survey respondents earning more than $84,000 per year. The PMI salary survey breaks down what project management professionals earn according to a variety of variables, including title, educational background and industry.

Project managers' salaries are primarily a function of their rank inside their organizations as well as their level of experience. Thus, entry-level project managers earn the least, while directors of project management earn the most, with a median annual salary of $123,000. Just as title and experience positively influence a project management professional's salary, so too does their level of education. Project managers with Master's degrees and PhDs earn more than project managers who hold Bachelor's degrees. The pay disparity between men and women in project management persists, with men tending to earn more than women.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Own Your Brand: Be the CEO of Your Job Search
Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune, April 26

In order to be successful in their career, job seekers need to be able to showcase their experience across multiple Web platforms. To attract the attention of hiring managers effectively, think of your skills and accomplishments as a valuable product or service for a company that is looking to solve a problem. As a result, online profiles on social media such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter become a way to personalize your brand and secure your future career. With this as context, the article reviews practical rules that apply to this group of social networking sites.

On social networking sites, your profile picture gives the recruiter or HR manager a much deeper glimpse into who you are than one might originally think. Your picture should be professional. If ageism is a concern, consider taking a picture of your networking or business card. Also, there's one question to ask yourself once your profile is complete: "Are you being authentic?" What you mention on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn will remain in search engines for months if not years, making personal integrity vital to your brand. In short, "Be who you are, with a filter."


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Arizona's New Immigration Law May Hurt Legal H-1B Workers
InfoWorld, April 27

Arizona’s controversial new state immigration law may cause complications for H-1B workers who can’t immediately prove they're working in the U.S. legally. In a worst-case scenario, H-1B workers might be detained by the police or even arrested if a law enforcement officer has a “reasonable suspicion” about his or her immigration status. Many H1-B visa holders aren't likely to carry valuable and hard-to-replace paperwork on them at all times for practical reasons. As a result, the new Arizona law may have a chilling effect on the efforts of technology companies within the state to attract talented new workers from overseas.

The Arizona immigration legislation, signed into law by Governor Jan Brewer, impacts the type of documentation that H-1B workers will be required to have. The main documents that foreign workers would need to show if asked include their I-94 card, which shows their lawful status, and most likely their passport. Immigration experts noted that there are a number of ways that an H-1B worker can be in this country legally, but not have the paperwork to prove it. For example, a worker could be carrying an expired I-94 card while waiting for new paperwork from U.S. immigration authorities, a process that could take months. Under current laws that worker could be in the U.S. legally even though the paperwork doesn't reflect it.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Five Rules For Networking Without Looking Desperate
MoneyWatch, April 26

With the national unemployment rate still hovering around 10%, networking is more relevant than ever for career development. Networking is something you should continually be doing. That means networking can’t be something you put on a to-do list and check off once a month. With that in mind, the article offers five practical rules to become an expert networker, without looking desperate.

Most importantly, learn to nurture your network. The key to good networking is distinguishing it from asking for a job, a contact, or a personal favor. Networking by definition means talking to people when you don’t need something. Keeping in touch is crucial, so that when you need someone, a follow-up isn’t like an initial meeting. You should also keep your online profile active; you never know who’s watching. Always ask how you can help others. Ask first not what your contact can do for you, but what you can do for your contact. Not only is it polite to ask about the other person, but also asking about them will send the signal that you have a peer-peer relationship, not a mentor-student one. Networking is about finding a win-win situation for all the parties involved in the connection.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Five Million Reasons To Love Your Local Community College
MentorNet News, April 2010

With the Obama Administration calling for five million additional graduates by the year 2020, community colleges are emerging as a key focal point for the nation’s leading educators. After long being ignored, community colleges are now set to receive billions of dollars in federal funding and are attracting the attention of educational leaders across the nation. Community colleges are at the forefront of embracing online learning and have extensive collaborative ties to local industry and their local communities. As a result, mentoring opportunities at the community college level are gaining in popularity and importance.

There are a number of reasons why community colleges are particularly fertile environments for new mentoring relationships. Their students are disproportionately likely to be from an underserved or underrepresented minority ethnic group. In addition, they are most likely to be working full-time, first-generation college-goers, inner city or rural, speakers of English as a second language, immigrants or first generation Americans, part-time students, poor, older, and to have children of their own. At the same time, these attributes make them important engines of diversity, acculturation, and prosperity. When these students are employed in well-paying positions, this has a huge ripple effect on the wealth of their families, communities, and states, since they are also more likely to work closer to home when they graduate.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top