Personal tools
You are here: Home Membership CareerNews Archives ACM CareerNews for Tuesday, October 19, 2010
Document Actions

ACM CareerNews for Tuesday, October 19, 2010

ACM CareerNews is intended as an objective career news digest for busy IT professionals. Views expressed are not necessarily those of ACM. To send comments, please write to careernews-request@acm.org

Volume 6, Issue 20, October 19, 2010




 

Flat Pay Turns IT Workers Into Job Seekers
Computerworld, October 7

As a result of companies cutting salaries, holding back on bonuses and piling more work on employees during the economic downturn, many IT professionals are now looking to change their jobs. According to Computerworld's latest salary poll, more than one third (36%) of the 343 respondents said they are looking to move to a new employer in the next six months. For employers, this means that as the economy improves, they should be taking steps to ensure that their most talented IT workers do not leave for something better.

According to the Computerworld salary poll, there are several reasons why employees are thinking about leaving. Most importantly, 69% of respondents have not received a pay raise in the past 6 months. Job satisfaction rates have also stagnated: compared with 6 months ago, satisfaction with compensation has declined with 32% of respondents. In fact, 20% of respondents said they were making less money than they were two years ago. 46% of respondents said they are less satisfied with their advancement opportunities than they were six months ago, compared with only 14% who said they are more satisfied.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


The New IT Survival Guide: How to Thrive After the Recession
InfoWorld, October 13

With the recession winding down, companies will be demanding new skills and competencies from their IT professionals – especially the types of skills that help them align the business and IT sides of the organization. With social networking, mobile and new software-as-a-service business models emerging within the enterprise, IT is no longer just about great technology. The "new normal" means that business skills are essential if you want to climb the ladder to IT management. There is strong demand for IT hands who have the skills to help deploy a new generation of cloud-enabled applications, virtualization, business intelligence, social networking, and mobile services.

IT workers should be thinking in terms of combining tech skills with a business mindset. Quite simply, workers must either learn new skills or risk becoming peripheral to the mission of the organization. This means thinking in terms of revenue-generating projects and monetization of existing technology initiatives. They must also think in terms of building and re-formulating relationships with business units. There is also new thinking about IT budgets, with a shift away from simple expense-cutting measures to more sophisticated deployments of IT, such as cloud computing and virtualization, that will save significant money in the not-too-distant future. Workers will also need to embrace greater use of personal technology, including mobile devices and social networking sites, within the enterprise.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Getting Ahead as a High-Potential Manager
Career Journal, October 11

Many companies are grooming high potential executives as they try to retain rising stars during the recovery, according to leadership consultants, business schools and management coaches. For example, the Center for Creative Leadership has seen enrollment in its high-potential programs climb about 25% since fall 2008. There are certain things you can do to maximize your training and preparation as a high-potential manager. For example, participation in an outside training program can hasten your promotion by improving your internal negotiation and networking skills. While this additional training and access to mentors can challenge you to think differently, they do not always guarantee that you’ll achieve your corporate ambitions.

Unfortunately, a significant number of high potential workers derail their careers because they assume that there is a clear path to the top. You can avoid that fate by being keenly aware of your gaps and developmental needs. To increase your self-awareness, seek regular rigorous assessments and help crafting a personal development plan. If your employer encourages leadership training, select the type that successful high potential workers embraced. You also need influential mentors who can enhance your visibility among senior executives. Cross-functional experiences and peer feedback acquired through mentor programs will help you do your regular job better.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


How Job Seekers May Use Social Media in the Future
Mashable, October 11

As more companies embrace social media to find candidates, job seekers should be adjusting their job search strategy to reflect this new reality. Rather than posting jobs in the newspaper or on job boards, companies are using social media to help them to cast a wider net. The future of recruiting is social, with new tools and updated strategies to help organizations fill positions quickly and with new employees who are a good fit for their corporate culture. The article takes a closer look at the ways job seekers can adapt their approach to take advantage of good opportunities using social media.

To optimize their job search, job seekers should make an effort to learn how companies in their desired industries are posting job openings, and then peruse those areas often. Job seekers should keep their eyes on their target employer’s tweets, posts and updates. Using social media first when trying to recruit enables companies to hire people who are connected to the personal networks of their employees. Job seekers should also improve their search skills in order to improve their access to social networking sites. They should focus on the most popular sites, such as LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook to communicate with potential contacts.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


To Get Paid What You're Worth, Know Your Disruptive Skills
Harvard Business Review Blog, September 14

If you feel that you are getting paid less than your intrinsic value, focus on your undervalued strengths and competencies that make you stand out from your peers. By doing so, you can establish a higher market value for your skills. Sometimes, these strengths are not apparent – such as searchlight intelligence, which is the ability to readily discern connections across spheres and domains. As the article points out, we often overlook our best skills — our innate talents — simply because we perform them without even thinking. Too many people overvalue what they are not and undervalue what they are.

As you look to close the gap between what we're paid and what we're worth, think about the way the market perceives you. Not surprisingly, professionals who lead with their unique or disruptive capabilities command the highest absolute premium. The same is true in the stock market. The market pays top dollar, applying a premium multiple for disruptive innovation, because the odds for disruptors are much better when it comes to success and revenue potential.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


The Future of Web Working: Management
GigaOm, October 11

As more companies distribute work outside the organization, there will be a higher premium placed on people who are capable of managing Web workers. As businesses move more of their workers out of centralized offices and embrace the distributed model, even jobs closer to the central core of an organization will be done remotely. Web workers can take steps now to prepare for this fundamental change in the way we work. With that in mind, the article provides a handful of tips that can prepare you for the new future of Web work.

Reading books about management will give you insights you might not be able to get just from lived experience. Books alone aren’t a substitute for experience, but they’ll help you evaluate your own approaches, and learn some new tricks. Pay special attention to integrating communication skills as part of your management strategy, which is especially important when you’re dealing with people at a distance. Also, ask for and take responsibility. If you’re already working as part of a distributed team and there’s no direct supervisor involved in the group, you have an opportunity to step up and take a leadership role. Taking on added responsibility will pay dividends in the long run, even if in the short term it doesn’t actually result in any extra cash compensation.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Men and Women Entrepreneurs: Not That Different
Tech Crunch, October 10

Guest contributor Vivek Wadhwa, who has experienced the technology industry as both an entrepreneur and academic, comments on the changing composition of America’s entrepreneurial class. In doing so, he overturns the conventional wisdom about when and why men and women become entrepreneurs. Based on a review of the backgrounds of startup founders in the tech industry and founders of companies in fast-growing industries, a new picture emerges. For example, the average age of a successful tech-company founder is 39, not 21. Moreover, founders of high-growth companies are likely to be married and to have two or more kids. People start companies after six to ten years of work experience, usually because they get tired of working for others and want to build wealth before they retire.

The popular consensus is that there are significant differences between men and women entrepreneurs. Instead, after crunching the data, it turns out that there is almost no difference between men and women company founders. Both groups had an equally strong desire to build wealth; wanted to capitalize on business ideas; were attracted to the culture of startups; had long-standing desire to own their own company; and were tired of working for others. Equally importantly, there was no difference in life circumstances between men and women founders. Their average ages when founding their first companies were the same. Likewise, successful men and women entrepreneurs founded their first companies when they had similar numbers of children living at home.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


The Hub: Office Space Sanctuaries for Freelancers
GOOD Magazine, October 9

In this age of wireless connectivity and widespread downsizing, workers are looking for alternatives to the office environment. They are looking for a balance that takes advantage of face time with coworkers as well as the freedom and flexibility of freelancing. Co-working spaces such as the Hub are being created in response to the growing number of people working, either freelance or on their own initiatives, in the solitary confinement of their own spaces. The co-working environment grew out of deep belief that there’s a new approach to how work is done, with a greater focus on mobility and collaboration with other solo professionals.

The Hub has become a meeting place for working communities across the globe. It has spread from London to more than 25 locations around the world—from Tel Aviv to Amsterdam to São Paolo, with Hubs due to open in Los Angeles, New York, and Washington, D.C., in 2011. Each one comes equipped with the network’s blueprint for success: a developed IT infrastructure as well as a Hub staffer charged with maintaining a diverse mix in membership, facilitating networking among members, and serving as the go-to person for issues ranging from IT problems to lunch-spot suggestions.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Three Biggest Myths about Teaching Online Education
eLearn Magazine, September 24

In the period between 2006 and 2009, the number of students enrolled in online education skyrocketed from 3.2 million to 12 million, according to research firm Ambient Insight. Despite the rise in popularity of online degree programs, however, many instructors still have misperceptions of what teaching "distance education" truly entails. They often think, mistakenly, that teaching online will be easier and demand fewer resources than teaching traditional courses. The article provides the top three myths about online education as a resource for prospective online educators.

The first myth is that teaching online will take less time since you don't have to be in class three hours a week. Teaching an online class - especially for the first time - can be extremely hectic. Because these classes are supposed to be designed to be just as complex and intense as campus-based classes and because there is little or no face-to-face interaction - they require much time, energy, and creativity to transform an online class into a meaningful learning experience for students. It's important to remember that teaching an online course is no different from teaching a campus-based course: you'll still need to prepare class materials, grade, and find ways to engage your students.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Education's Most Startling Paradox: K-12 Computer Science Education Declines
ACM Press Room, October 6

In an effort to improve K-12 computer science education in our nation’s schools, a number of leading associations, corporations, scientific societies and nonprofit organizations have created a new non-partisan advocacy coalition, Computing in the Core (CinC). The organization, which is supported in part by ACM, will advance computer science education as a way to drive job growth and advance scientific discovery. According to a new report from ACM and Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA), approximately two-thirds of the country have few computer science education standards for secondary school education, and most states treat high school computer science courses as simply an elective and not part of a student’s core education.

CinC’s website features computer science education research, facts, resources, and actions for the public to take to become involved in advocacy outreach. CinC seeks to strengthen K-12 computer science education and ensure that computer science will prepare students for jobs in a digital economy. Highlighting the need for a powerful voice such as CinC, a recent study found that only 14 states have adopted significant education standards for high school computer science, and 14 states and the District of Columbia have not adopted a single upper-level standard for computer science instruction. Currently, only 10 states count high school computer science courses as a core academic subject in their graduation requirements. Computer science education needs to move beyond mere technological literacy to focus on advanced concepts such as understanding and applying algorithmic and computational thinking.


Click Here to View Full Article
to the top