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ACM Names 38 Fellows for Computing and IT Innovations

acm

The Association for Computing Machinery

Advancing Computing as a Science & Profession

Contact: Virginia Gold

212-626-0505

vgold@acm.org

ACM NAMES 38 FELLOWS FOR COMPUTING AND IT INNOVATIONS IN INDUSTRY, EDUCATION, ENTERTAINMENT

New York, NY, December 3, 2007 -- ACM has recognized 38 of its members for their contributions to computing technology that have brought advances in the way people live and work throughout the world. The 2007 ACM Fellows, from the world’s leading universities, industries, and research labs, created innovations in a range of computing disciplines that affect theory and practice, education and entertainment, industry and commerce.

"These men and women are the inventors of technology that impacts our society in profound and tangible ways every day," said ACM President Stuart Feldman. "They have pushed the boundaries of their respective computing disciplines to create remarkable achievements that have the potential to make our world more accessible, more secure, and more advanced. Their selection as 2007 ACM Fellows offers us an opportunity to recognize their dedicated leadership in this dynamic field, and to honor their contributions to solving complex problems, expanding the impact of technology, and advancing the quality of life for people everywhere."

Within the corporate sector, the 2007 Fellows named from Microsoft Research, including one from Microsoft China, were cited for contributions ranging from computer graphics to video and image content analysis and retrieval. Other corporate entities with 2007 Fellows were Intel Corp., Yahoo!, and Bell Labs Research, Alcatel-Lucent. Their respective contributions include mathematical foundations for optimizing compilers, algorithms and Web technology, and data semantics for Web services.

Among the list of universities with 2007 ACM Fellows was Stanford University, whose five fellows were respectively recognized for achievements in artificial intelligence, compilers and program analysis, computational biology, complexity theory, and computer science education. Carnegie Mellon University’s three Fellows were honored for learning theory and algorithms, using programming environments in education and entertainment, and computer-aided design of integrated circuits and systems. The Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel had two Fellows, who were cited for database theory and fault-tolerant distributed computing. New York University’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences two recipients were recognized for symbolic computation, computational biology and system verification. The University of Southern California’s two ACM Fellows were honored for advances in parallel, distributed and reconfigurable computing, and modeling and nanorobotics.

Other U.S. universities with 2007 ACM Fellows include: the University of Chicago; Cornell University; University of Delaware; the University of Illinois at Urbana -Champaign; Northeastern University; the University of Pennsylvania; Princeton University; the University of Michigan Ann Arbor; the University of Massachusetts Amherst; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and the University of California at Berkeley, Los Angeles and Riverside. ACM Fellows from these institutions were cited for achievements in parallel and reconfigurable computing; verification of reactive and hybrid systems; design of scalable, reliable Internet services; security and public policy of information technology; complexity theory; multiprocessor computers and compiler optimization techniques; computer vision; computational biology; memory management; computer-supported collaborative work; parallel computing; computer graphics; and type theory and program analysis.

Outside of North America, the universities with 2007 ACM Fellows include Victoria University of Wellington New Zealand; and University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Fellows from these universities were recognized for contributions to software design; compatibility and complexity theory; artificial intelligence theory and database systems; and programming languages theory. In addition, ACM named a Fellow from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland for excellence in functional and object-oriented programming languages; and an independent consultant was named for his contributions to networking standards and Internet applications. Finally, two 2007 ACM Fellows had dual affiliations: one with the University of Madeira in Funchal, Portugal and Constantine & Lockwood, Ltd., an international design consulting firm in Massachusetts; and one with Oxford University in England and Vienna University of Technology.

ACM will formally recognize the 2007 Fellows at its annual Awards Banquet on June 21, 2008, in San Francisco, CA. Additional information about the ACM 2007 Fellows, the awards event, as well as previous ACM Fellows and award winners is available at www.acm.org/awards.


2007 ACM Fellows

Anant Agarwal, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
For contributions to parallel and reconfigurable computing

Rajeev Alur, University of Pennsylvania
For contributions to specification and verification of reactive and hybrid systems

Utpal Banerjee, Intel Corp.
For contributions to mathematical foundations of optimizing parallelizing compilers

Catriel Beeri, The Hebrew University
For contributions to database theory

Avrim Blum, Carnegie Mellon University
For contributions to learning theory and algorithms

Eric A. Brewer, University of California, Berkeley
For contributions to design of scalable, reliable Internet services

Andrei Z. Broder, Yahoo! Research
For contributions to algorithms and web technology

Michael F. Cohen, Microsoft Research
For contributions to computer graphics and computer vision

Larry L. Constantine, University of Madeira, Constantine & Lockwood, Ltd.
For contributions to software design

Danny Dolev, The Hebrew University
For contributions to fault-tolerant distributed computing

Rodney Graham Downey, Victoria University of Wellington
For contributions to computability and complexity theory

Edward Feigenbaum, Stanford University
For contributions to artificial intelligence

Edward W. Felten, Princeton University
For contributions to security and the public policy of information technology

Lance J. Fortnow, University of Chicago
For contributions to complexity theory

Guang R. Gao, University of Delaware
For contributions to multiprocessor computers and compiler optimization techniques

Georg Gottlob, Oxford University/Vienna University of Technology
For contributions to theory of artificial intelligence and database systems

Richard Hull, Bell Labs Research, Alcatel-Lucent
For contributions to data semantics and web services

Daniel P. Huttenlocher, Cornell University
For contributions to computer vision

Tao Jiang, University of California, Riverside
For contributions to computational biology and computational complexity

John C. Klensin, Consultant
For contributions to networking standards and internet applications

Monica S. Lam, Stanford University
For contributions to compilers and program analysis

Marc Levoy, Stanford University
For contributions to computer graphics

Bhubaneswar Mishra, New York University
Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences
For contributions to symbolic computation and computational biology

J. Eliot B. Moss, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
For contributions to transactions and memory management

Rajeev Motwani, Stanford University
For contributions to algorithms and complexity theory

Martin Odersky, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
For contributions to functional and object-oriented programming languages

Gary M. Olson, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
For contributions to computer-supported collaborative work

David Padua, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
For contributions to compiler support for parallel computing

Randy Pausch, Carnegie Mellon University
For contributions to use of programming environments in education and entertainment

Amir Pnueli, New York University
Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences
For contributions to program and system verification

Viktor K. Prasanna, University of Southern California
For contributions to parallel, distributed and reconfigurable computing

Aristides A. G. Requicha, University of Southern California
For contributions to solid modeling and nanorobotics

Eric S. Roberts, Stanford University
For contributions to computer science education

Demetri Terzopoulos, University of California, Los Angeles
For contributions to computer graphics and vision

Donald E Thomas, Carnegie Mellon University
For contributions to computer-aided design of integrated circuits and systems

Philip Wadler, Edinburgh University
For contributions to theory of programming languages

Mitchell Wand, Northeastern University
For contributions to type theory and program analysis

HongJiang Zhang, Microsoft - Advanced Technology Center, Beijing
For contributions to content-based analysis and retrieval of multimedia

About ACM
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery http://www.acm.org, is an educational and scientific society uniting the world’s computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field’s challenges. ACM strengthens the profession’s collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for life-long learning, career development, and professional networking.

About the ACM Fellows Program
The ACM Fellows Program, initiated in 1993, celebrates the exceptional contributions of the leading members in the computing field. These individuals have helped to enlighten researchers, developers, practitioners and end-users of information technology throughout the world. The new ACM Fellows join a distinguished list of colleagues to whom ACM and its members look for guidance and leadership in computing and information technology.

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