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ACM Names 44 Fellows for Contributions to Computing and IT

Many Innovations Made in Areas Critical to Global Competitiveness

acm
The Association for Computing Machinery
Advancing Computing as a Science & Profession

Contact: Virginia Gold
212-626-0505
vgold@acm.org

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New York, NY, January 15, 2009 -- ACM has recognized 44 of its members for their contributions to computing technology that have generated a broad range of innovations for industry, commerce, entertainment, and education.  The 2008 ACM Fellows, from the world’s leading universities, industries, and research labs, created advances in computer theory as well as practice.  These technology developments have consistently demonstrated their crucial role in forming the foundation for sustained economic growth in an information-based society.   

            “These men and women are the inventors of technology that impact the way people live and work throughout the world,” said ACM President, Professor Dame Wendy Hall.  “Their selection as 2008 ACM Fellows offers us an opportunity to recognize their dedicated leadership in this dynamic field, and to honor their contributions to solving complex problems, expanding the impact of technology, and advancing the quality of life for people everywhere.” 

 

            The complete list of 2008 ACM Fellows is appended at the end of this announcement and at http://fellows.acm.org.

 

            Within the corporate sector, the 2008 ACM Fellows named from Microsoft Research were cited for contributions ranging from computer security and verification to human-computer interaction, computational photography and distributed computing.  IBM Almaden and Thomas J. Watson Research Centers each had Fellows, who were recognized for query-processing language and computational geometry, which is often used in the development of computer graphics, computer-aided design, robotics, and other applications.  Other corporate entities with 2008 Fellows were Intel Corp., Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, and Palo Alto Research Center.  Their respective contributions include compiler technology and computer performance enhancement tools, database management and computer communications protocols.

 

            Among the universities with 2008 ACM Fellows was Stanford University, whose Fellows were recognized for achievements in programming language theory, rendering theory for use in computer graphics, software engineering process discipline, and reinventing virtual machines for more efficient operating system functioning. Fellows from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) were honored for achievements in computer networking and distributed systems, theory of mathematical programming, development of the Macsyma system for symbolic mathematics, and algorithms and complexity theory.  Princeton University’s Fellows were acknowledged for advances in probabilistically checkable proofs and optimization problems, computer music as well as physics-based sound synthesis, and network control and management systems.  Carnegie Mellon University’s Fellows were recognized for contributions to computer-aided design tools, for combinatorial auctions and mechanism design, often used in game theory, and for software engineering process discipline.  Fellows from the University of Toronto were cited for contributions to the theory of computational complexity, and for computer-aided design of semiconductor devices known as field-programmable gate arrays.

 

            Other North American universities with 2008 ACM Fellows include Georgia Institute of Technology; the University of Virginia; the University of Minnesota; the University of Texas at Austin; the University of Waterloo; the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Rice University; and the University of California at Santa Cruz, Los Angeles, Berkeley, and Irvine.  ACM Fellows from these institutions were cited for achievements in ubiquitous computing research, emphasizing applications for education, home, and health; compiler design and implementation; human-computer interaction; compilers and memory management; algorithms and data structures; fault-tolerant distributed computing; technologies for parallel computing; computer security; computer communications protocols; electronic design automation; computer vision; and computer-supported cooperative work.

 

            Outside of North America, the universities with 2008 ACM Fellows include City University of Hong Kong in China; ETH (the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Zurich in Switzerland; the University of Cambridge and Newcastle University in the UK; and Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.  Fellows from these universities were recognized for contributions to the interface of algorithmic methodology and game theory; software engineering and programming languages; theorem provers and verification techniques; dependable computing and computer history; and design of high performance memory systems.

 

            ACM also named a 2008 Fellow from Viewpoints Research Institute, a nonprofit research organization, who has made fundamental contributions to personal computing and object-oriented programming. 

 

            ACM will formally recognize the 2008 Fellows at its annual Awards Banquet on June 27, 2009, in San Diego, CA.  Additional information about the ACM 2008 Fellows, the awards event, as well as previous ACM Fellows and award winners is available at www.acm.org/awards.

 

2008 ACM Fellows

Martín Abadi

Microsoft Research Silicon Valley / University of California, Santa Cruz

For contributions to computer security and verification of computer systems

Gregory D. Abowd
Georgia Institute of Technology

For contributions to ubiquitous computing research, with emphasis on applications for education, home and health

Alexander S. Aiken
Stanford University

For contributions to programming language theory and systems

Sanjeev Arora
Princeton University

For foundational work on probabilistically checkable proofs and approximate solutions to NP-hard optimization problems

Hari Balakrishnan
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

For contributions to computer networking and distributed systems

William Buxton
Microsoft Research

For contributions to the field of human-computer interaction

Kenneth Clarkson
IBM Almaden Research Center

For contributions to computational geometry

Jason (Jingsheng) Cong
University of California at Los Angeles

For contributions to electronic design automation

Perry R. Cook  
Princeton University

For contributions to computer music, physics-based sound synthesis and voice analysis/synthesis

Stephen A. Cook
University of Toronto

For fundamental contributions to the theory of computational complexity

Jack W. Davidson
University of Virginia

For contributions in compiler design and implementation

Umeshwar Dayal
Hewlett-Packard Laboratories

For contributions to managing federated, active, and heterogeneous databases

Xiaotie Deng
City University of Hong Kong

For contributions to the interface of algorithmic methodology and game theory

Jose Joaquin Garcia-Luna-Aceves
University of California, Santa Cruz /Palo Alto Research Center

For contributions to the theory and design of computer communication protocols

Michel X. Goemans
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

For contributions to the theory of approximation algorithms and mathematical programming

Patrick Hanrahan
Stanford University

For contributions to rendering theory and systems

Charles H. House
Stanford University MediaX Program

For distinguished service and contributions to ACM and the computing community

Watts S. Humphrey
Carnegie Mellon University

For contributions to software engineering process discipline

Alan C. Kay
Viewpoints Research Institute

For fundamental contributions to personal computing and object-oriented programming

Joseph A. Konstan
University of Minnesota

For contributions to human-computer interaction

Roy Levin
Microsoft Research Silicon Valley

For contributions to software and systems

P. Geoffrey Lowney
Intel Corp.

For contributions to compiler technology and performance enhancement tools

Jitendra Malik
University of California, Berkeley

For contributions to computer vision

Kathryn S. McKinley
University of Texas at Austin

For contributions to compilers and memory management

Bertrand Meyer
ETH (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Zurich

For contributions to software engineering and programming languages

 John C. Mitchell
Stanford University

For contributions to the theory of programming language

Joel Moses
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

For developing the Macsyma computer system for formula manipulation

J. Ian Munro
University of Waterloo

For contributions to algorithms and data structures

Judith S. Olson
University of California at Irvine

For contributions to human-computer interaction and computer-supported cooperative work

Lawrence C.  Paulson
University of Cambridge, Computer Laboratory

For contributions to theorem provers and verification techniques

Hamid Pirahesh
IBM Almaden Research Center

For contributions to query processing and query languages

Brian Randell
Newcastle University

For contributions to dependable computing and computer history

Michael K. Reiter
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

For contributions to computer security and fault-tolerant distributed computing

Jennifer Rexford
Princeton University

For contributions to network control and management systems

Jonathan S. Rose
University of Toronto

For contributions to the architecture and computer-aided design of field-programmable gate arrays

Mendel Rosenblum
Stanford University

For contributions to reinventing virtual machines

Rob A. Rutenbar
Carnegie Mellon University

For contributions to computer-aided design tools for mixed-signal integrated circuits

Tuomas Sandholm
Carnegie Mellon University

For contributions to combinatorial auctions and mechanism design

Vivek Sarkar
Rice University

For contributions to technologies for parallel computing

Mark S. Squillante
IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center

For contributions to the theory and practice of stochastic modeling

Per Stenstrom
Chalmers University of Technology

For contributions to the design of high-performance memory systems

Madhu Sudan
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

For contributions to algorithms and complexity theory

Richard Szeliski
Microsoft Research

For contributions to computational photography

Douglas Terry
Microsoft Research Silicon Valley

For contributions to distributed computing

About ACM
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery http://www.acm.org, is an educational and scientific society uniting the world’s computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field’s challenges. ACM strengthens the profession’s collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for life-long learning, career development, and professional networking.

About the ACM Fellows Program
The ACM Fellows Program, initiated in 1993, celebrates the exceptional contributions of the leading members in the computing field. These individuals have helped to enlighten researchers, developers, practitioners and end-users of information technology throughout the world. The new ACM Fellows join a distinguished list of colleagues to whom ACM and its members look for guidance and leadership in computing and information technology.

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