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ACM Fellows Named for Computing Innovations that Advance Technologies in Information Age

2012 Fellows Hail from World’s Leading Universities and Corporations

acm
The Association for Computing Machinery
Advancing Computing as a Science & Profession

Contact: Virginia Gold
212-626-0505
vgold@acm.org

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NEW YORK, December 11, 2012—ACM has recognized 52 of its members for their contributions to computing that are fundamentally advancing technology in healthcare, cybersecurity, science, communications, entertainment, business, and education.  The 2012 ACM Fellows personify the highest achievements in computing research and development from the world’s leading universities, corporations, and research labs, with innovations that are driving economic growth in the digital environment.

“These men and women are advancing the art and science of computing with enormous impacts for how we live and work,” said ACM President Vinton G. Cerf.  “The impact of their contributions highlights the role of computing in creating advances that range from commonplace applications to extraordinary breakthroughs, and from the theoretical to the practical.  Some recipients have also helped to broaden participation in computing, particularly among underrepresented groups, and to expand its impact across multiple disciplines.”

The complete list of 2012 ACM Fellows is appended to this announcement.

Within the corporate sector, the 2012 ACM Fellows named from Hewlett-Packard were cited for contributions to multithreaded programming and automatic memory management, and to matrix computations and parallel scientific computing. IBM Research’s Fellow was recognized for advances in programming languages and open-source research infrastructures. Goldman Sachs’s Fellow was cited for contributions to high performance computing software and compiler optimizations. Microsoft Research’s ACM Fellow was honored for achievements in human-computer interaction focusing on computer-supported cooperative work.  Other companies with 2012 ACM Fellows are Amazon, NVIDIA, Mentor Graphics, and Cattell.Net. Their respective contributions include analysis and management of large data sets; interconnection networks and supercomputers; geometric computing and integrated circuit design tools; and database systems.  

Among the universities with 2012 ACM Fellows are the University of California, with representatives from Irvine, San Diego, and Berkeley campuses, and a joint position with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.  These Fellows were recognized for achievements in artificial intelligence for bioinformatics; design automation and manufacturability of microelectronic systems; applications of randomized algorithms to statistical physics; networking, distributed systems, and cloud computing; and improved programmer productivity.  ACM Fellows at Carnegie Mellon University included those honored for contributions to reliability of storage systems, and artificial intelligence systems. Cornell University’s ACM Fellows were honored for artificial intelligence applications to automated reasoning, and optimization in computer vision.  Harvard University’s ACM Fellow was cited for transformative contributions to the theory of computation.

Other North American universities with 2012 ACM Fellows include University of Toronto; Colorado School of Mines; University of Maryland; University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Naval Postgraduate School; University of Calgary; University of Washington; University of Waterloo; and University of British Columbia.  ACM Fellows from these institutions were cited respectively for achievements in knowledge representation and computational decision making; wireless networking; image processing and computer vision; network protocols and internet routing; digital forensics and computer security education; ubiquitous computing; algorithms and their use in systems design study; computer communication networks and systems; and aspect-oriented programming language design and implementation.

In addition, 2012 ACM Fellows were named from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Smith College; University of Pennsylvania; University of Texas, Austin; Polytechnic Institute of New York University; University of Michigan; Stanford University; Columbia University; Brown University; and Ohio State University. Their achievements addressed quality-of-service management for distributed multimedia systems; computational geometry; theory and practice of programming languages; parallel programming and parallel compilation theory and practice; computer networks design and Internet applications; algorithms for hardware verification; the intersection of artificial intelligence, logic, and economics; combinatorial optimization and analysis of graph algorithms; graph drawing, algorithms and data structures; and distributed systems data and memory management.

Among universities outside North America, the 2012 ACM Fellows hailed from ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), University of Edinburgh, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), and Tel Aviv University.  Fellows from these universities were recognized respectively for achievements in distributed systems, middleware, and data management; computer graphics and animation; Web data management; finite model theory and database theory; reliable distributed computing and hardware and software verification technology; and business process management and bioinformatics. 

Other 2012 ACM Fellows were named from Aarhus University in Denmark, Qatar Computing Research Institute, University of Tokyo, University of Cambridge, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), National Institute for Computer Science and Automatics (INRIA) and LIRMM in France.  Their contributions respectively are in the areas of massive data algorithmics; database management systems; high performance database systems; programming language semantics theory; software engineering and revision control systems; and parallel and distributed data management.
 
ACM will formally recognize the 2012 Fellows at its annual Awards Banquet on June 15, 2013, in San Francisco, CA. Additional information about the ACM 2012 Fellows, the awards event, as well as previous ACM Fellows and award winners is available at www.acm.org/awards.

 
2012 Fellows and Citations

 

Gustavo Alonso
ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)
For contributions to distributed systems, middleware, and data management
Tova Milo
Tel Aviv University
For contributions to database theory and business process management
Lars Arge
Aarhus University
For contributions to massive data algorithmics
Klara Nahrstedt
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
For contributions to quality-of-service management for distributed multimedia systems
Pierre Baldi
University of California, Irvine
For contributions to artificial intelligence and statistical machine learning for bioinformatics
Joseph O'Rourke
Smith College
For contributions to computational geometry and for broadening participation in computing
Hans-J. Boehm
Hewlett-Packard
For contributions to multithreaded programming and to algorithms and libraries for automatic memory management
Benjamin C. Pierce
University of Pennsylvania
For contributions to the theory and practice of programming languages and their type systems
Craig Boutilier
University of Toronto
For contributions to knowledge representation and computational decision making
Keshav K. Pingali
University of Texas, Austin
For contributions to data-centric parallel programming and to parallel compilation theory and practice
Tracy K. Camp
Colorado School of Mines
For contributions in wireless networking and leadership in broadening participation in computing
Andrew M. Pitts
University of Cambridge
For contributions to the theory of programming language semantics
Rick Cattell
Cattell.Net LLC
For contributions to database systems
Rajeev R. Rastogi
Amazon
For contributions to the analysis and management of large data sets
Larry S. Davis
University of Maryland
For contributions to image processing and computer vision
Raj Reddy
Carnegie Mellon University
For pioneering the design and construction of large scale artificial intelligence systems
Ahmed K. Elmagarmid
Qatar Computing Research Institute
For contributions to database management systems
Keith Ross
Polytechnic Institute of New York University
For contributions to the design and modeling of computer networks and Internet applications
Wenfei Fan
University of Edinburgh
For contributions to Web data management
Karem Sakallah
University of Michigan
For algorithms for Boolean satisfiability that advanced the state-of-the-art of hardware verification
Lixin Gao
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
For contributions to network protocols and internet routing
Robert S. Schreiber
Hewlett-Packard
For contributions to matrix computations and to languages, compilers, and architectures for parallel scientific computing
Simson Garfinkel
Naval Postgraduate School
For contributions to digital forensics and to computer security education
Steven Scott
NVIDIA
For contributions to the architecture of interconnection networks and supercomputers
Garth A. Gibson
Carnegie Mellon University
For contributions to the performance and reliability of storage systems
Bart Selman
Cornell University
For contributions to artificial intelligence with applications to automated reasoning and planning
Saul Greenberg
University of Calgary
For contributions to computer supported cooperative work and ubiquitous computing
Ron Shamir
Tel Aviv University
For contributions to bioinformatics
Markus Gross
ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)/Disney Research, Zurich
For contributions to computer graphics and animation
Yoav Shoham
Stanford University
For contributions at the intersection of artificial intelligence, logic, and economics
David P. Grove
IBM Research
For contributions to programming languages and for the development of open-source research infrastructures 
Joseph Sifakis
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
For contributions to hardware and software verification technology
Jonathan Grudin
Microsoft Research
For contributions to human computer interaction with an emphasis on computer supported cooperative work
Alistair Sinclair
University of California, Berkeley
For contributions to randomized algorithms and their applications to statistical physics
Rachid Guerraoui
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
For contributions to the theory and practice of reliable distributed computing
Clifford Stein
Columbia University
For contributions to the theory of combinatorial optimization and to the design and analysis of graph algorithms
Manish Gupta
Goldman Sachs
For contributions to high performance computing software and compiler optimizations
Ion Stoica
University of California, Berkeley
For contributions to networking, distributed systems, and cloud computing
John Hershberger
Mentor Graphics Corporation
For contributions to geometric computing and to design tools for integrated circuits
Roberto Tamassia
Brown University
For contributions to graph drawing, algorithms and data structures and to computer science education
Andrew B. Kahng
University of California, San Diego
For contributions to physical design automation and to design for manufacturability of microelectronic systems
Walter F. Tichy
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
For contributions to software engineering and revision control systems
Anna Karlin
University of Washington
For contributions to the design and analysis of algorithms and their use in the study of systems design
Patrick Valduriez
National Institute for Computer Science and Automatics (INRIA) and LIRMM
For contributions to parallel and distributed data management
Srinivasan Keshav
University of Waterloo
For contributions to computer communication networks and systems
Leslie Valiant
Harvard University
For transformative contributions to the theory of computation
Gregor Kiczales
University of British Columbia
For contributions to aspect-oriented programming language design and implementation
Kathy Yelick
University of California at Berkeley/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
For contributions to parallel languages that improve programmer productivity
Masaru Kitsuregawa
University of Tokyo
For contributions to high performance database systems
Ramin Zabih
Cornell University
For contributions to discrete optimization in computer vision
Leonid Libkin
University of Edinburgh
For contributions to finite model theory and database theory
Xiaodong Zhang
Ohio State University
For contributions to data and memory management in distributed systems

About ACM
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery www.acm.org, is the world’s largest educational and scientific computing society, uniting computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field’s challenges. ACM strengthens the computing profession’s collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for life-long learning, career development, and professional networking. 

About the ACM Fellows Program
The ACM Fellows Program fellows.acm.org, initiated in 1993, celebrates the exceptional contributions of the leading members in the computing field.  These individuals have helped to enlighten researchers, developers, practitioners and end-users of information technology throughout the world. The new ACM Fellows join a distinguished list of colleagues to whom ACM and its members look for guidance and leadership in computing and information technology.

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