ACM SIG Proceedings Templates

Current ACM Proceedings Template - January 23, 2015

The official 2014-2015 ACM Proceedings Format is available as templates in the following formats.

  • Word
  • LaTeX2e Style

LaTeX2e

Use this set of files to produce articles WITH the permission block, conference location, copyright text, bibstrip, etc.

This style produces a tight-looking format (9pt) which invariably means fewer pages.

The complete description of updates to ACM files made in 2014-2015 according to the new specifications for ACM conferences and journals is available by clicking here.

Zip set of TeX template files for easy download (May, 2015).


HOW TO CLASSIFY WORKS USING ACM'S COMPUTING CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

 

An important aspect of preparing your paper for publication by ACM Press is to provide the proper indexing and retrieval information from the ACM Computing Classification System (CCS). This is beneficial to you because accurate categorization provides the reader with quick content reference, facilitating the search for related literature, as well as searches for your work in ACM's Digital Library and on other online resources.

 

Please read the HOW TO CLASSIFY WORKS USING ACM'S COMPUTING CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM for instructions on how to classify your document using the 2012 ACM Computing Classification System and insert the index terms into your LaTeX or Microsoft Word source file.


If you have LaTeX-specific questions please consider checking out the SIG FAQ FILE first.
All other questions can go to Adrienne Griscti at griscti@acm.org

TECHNICAL SUPPORT

Should you need technical help working with your LaTeX class files, please direct your query to:

acmtexsupport@aptaracorp.com

All email queries will be responded to within 24 hours.

Document Last Revised: January 7, 2016

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