Section 1.2

Criteria for Sponsor/Co-Sponsor Conference Approval

When the completed TMRF is submitted either in hard copy or online, Diana Brantuas (paf_tmrf@acm.org) will review the assumptions in the TMRF with regard to:

Conference Management Resources

The existence of a reasonable management structure is this volunteer infrastructure or contracted management, and the plans in place to handle the planning and mechanics of the conference are important resources to put in place if a conference is to succeed. For workshops, this would be a difference infrastructure than it would be a conference with several different activities (technical program, tutorials, exhibits, etc.)

Revenue and Expense Assumptions:

Including an evaluation of the current assumptions in light of the historical performance of the conference; the consideration of the possible expense categories; and the confirmation any external funding sources.

Legal, Contractual, and Asset Distribution Arrangements:

This would include facility compliance with ADA, copyright ownership, insurance considerations for large conferences, ability to repatriate funds for conferences outside the USA, plans for conference by-products, and sponsors liability reserves.

General Credibility of the Conference:

The Volunteer Management provides this evaluation based on conference attendance trends, the feedback from previous attendees, the changes in the field that are reflected in the current planning, the stature of the conference and program chairs, and the focus of the technical program.

The reviewed TMRF summary will be forwarded to the approving Volunteer Management. Once approved by them, the TMRF summary will be reviewed by the ACM Chief Operating Officer. If ACM Executive Committee approval is required, the ACM Chief Operating Officer will obtain that approval and sign the conference approval letter.

Every effort will be made to complete the official ACM/SIG approval process within four weeks of submission of the Technical Meeting Request Form(s) [TMRF].

Please note the 3-Section TMRF must be received by ACM Headquarters prior to the review/approval process.

Conference Approvers

Conference Characteristics Approvers for a New or International Conference Approvers for an Annual Conference
Sponsored/Co-Sponsored 
Revenue/Expense $500K and up
Volunteer Management
Chief Operating Officer
ACM Executive Committee
Volunteer Management
Chief Operating Officer
ACM Executive Committee
Sponsored/Co-Sponsored
Revenue/Expense less than $500K
Volunteer Management
Chief Operating Officer
Volunteer Management
Chief Operating Officer
In Cooperation (no ACM/SIG Financial involvement) Volunteer Management ACM SIGs Services Director Volunteer Management ACM SIGs Services Director

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