Student Chapters: Getting Started

A Student chapter serves as a gateway to forums, panel discussions, and symposia that further a student's professional development. Preparation and presentation of technical reports and papers and cooperative efforts on research projects allow students to test their technical expertise.

 
Start an ACM Student Chapter in 4 easy steps.
 

* Entries made during the application process may be saved and completed at a later time by visiting the URL sent to the chapter email address.

Step 1:  Enter chapter name, chapter email address, chapter type, and chapter sub-type.

 

Step 2: Enter the names of the individuals to serve as Chair, Vice Chair and Treasurer. These individuals must be ACM Student Members. In addition, a Faculty Sponsor with an  ACM  Professional Membership is required.

 

Step 3: Enter chapter contact information (postal address and phone number).

 

Step 4: Enter the names of at least ten (10) individuals willing to carry out the chapter's mission and participate in activities.  A CSV file (comma-separated values) containing the last name, middle initial, first name, and email addresses of these members will be required through the automated chartering application.                        

                                   Example: "Doe","John","johndoe@domain.com" 

You may enter each member name individually.                                                             
 

Once the completed application is submitted, it will be reviewed by the Local Activities Manager within 5-7 business days.

 

Note:
FOR UNITED STATES CHAPTERS: 
The IRS requires chapters operating in the United States to have an Employer Identification Number (EIN). The EIN will serve as proof of a chapter’s nonprofit status and allow ACM to include the chapter in our annual group filing with the IRS. ACM will request an EIN on your behalf which you will receive upon chartering.

Need Help? Contact Chartering

ACM Case Studies

Written by leading domain experts for software engineers, ACM Case Studies provide an in-depth look at how software teams overcome specific challenges by implementing new technologies, adopting new practices, or a combination of both. Often through first-hand accounts, these pieces explore what the challenges were, the tools and techniques that were used to combat them, and the solution that was achieved.

Why I Belong to ACM

Hear from Bryan Cantrill, vice president of engineering at Joyent, Ben Fried chief information officer at Google, and Theo Schlossnagle, OmniTI founder on why they are members of ACM.

Edge Computing

ACM Queue’s “Research for Practice” is your number one resource for keeping up with emerging developments in the world of theory and applying them to the challenges you face on a daily basis. RfP consistently serves up expert-curated guides to the best of CS research, and relates these breakthroughs to the challenges that software engineers face every day. In this installment of RfP is by Nitesh Mor, a PhD candidate at UC Berkeley working on the next generation of globally distributed computer systems with a special focus on data security and privacy. Titled “Edge Computing,” this RfP gives an overview of some of the most exciting work being done in the area of computing infrastructures and applications. It provides an academic view of edge computing through samples of existing research whose applications will be highly relevant in the coming years.