A Practical Guide to the Responsibilities of ACM Chapters

ACM fosters growth in the computing community through its support of  more than 950 professional, student and local Special Interest Group chapters worldwide. These chapters establish a local presence for ACM in international cities large and small and seek to disseminate knowledge and advance the field of computing by sponsoring state-of-the-art seminars on pressing issues in information technology, conducting volunteer training workshops, hosting lectures by highly regarded computer professionals, and more.

Through its sponsorship of chapters, ACM facilitates the exchange of ideas among members from all backgrounds and from all facets of computing, from academia to research to business and industry. The list below lays out items that comprise the nuts and bolts of the responsibilities chapters face in many areas, including finance, membership, and conferences. Please click on any item to learn more.

Chapter Responsibilities

The DevOps Phenomenon

ACM Queue’s “Research for Practice” consistently serves up expert-curated guides to the best of computing research, and relates these breakthroughs to the challenges that software engineers face every day. This installment of RfP is by Anna Wiedemann, Nicole Forsgren, Manuel Wiesche, Heiko Gewald, and Helmut Krcmar. Titled “The DevOps Phenomenon,” this RfP gives an overview of stories from across the industry about software organizations overcoming the early hurdles of adopting DevOps practices, and coming out on the other side with tighter integration between their software and operations teams, faster delivery times for new software features, and achieving a higher level of stability.

Why I Belong to ACM

Hear from Bryan Cantrill, vice president of engineering at Joyent, Ben Fried chief information officer at Google, and Theo Schlossnagle, OmniTI founder on why they are members of ACM.