Encourage Your Networks to Celebrate Inspiring Women with #SheIsWhyICode

What is #SheIsWhyICode?

During Women’s History Month, ACM, the Association of Computing Machinery, is encouraging computing professionals and students to use the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode to share stories of women in computing who have inspired them at any point in their career or education. The stories might range in topic from one’s earliest introduction to computer science to overcoming a recent professional obstacle, and the subjects could vary from luminaries of the computing field to someone’s high school computer science teacher or current boss.

How Can I Get Involved?

We invite you to spread the word to your membership and communities, and encourage them to participate in this effort to celebrate the inspiring women in computing who have made an impact on their lives and careers by highlighting these women in posts to their favorite social networks using #SheIsWhyICode. The posts could take any form, such as photos, descriptions, or personalized videos describing the impact that the subject of the post has had.

Here are some sample posts you can share with your network to encourage participation:

Twitter

Which inspiring women in computing have made an impact on your career or education? During Women's History Month, @TheOfficialACM is encouraging people to highlight these remarkable individuals in posts using the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode.

Did a particular notable woman in computing pique your earliest fascination with computer science? Did you have a woman colleague who helped you become who you are today? This #WomensHistoryMonth, @TheOfficialACM encourages you to share their stories using the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode.

Facebook/LinkedIn/Instagram

During #WomensHistoryMonth, ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, is encouraging computing professionals and students to use the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode to share stories of women in computing who have inspired them at any point in their career or education. If a particular woman played a large role in making you the computing professional you are today, we encourage you to take part in this celebration by sharing photos, descriptions, or personalized videos about these women to your social network of choice.

Did a particular notable woman in computing luminary pique your earliest fascination with computer science? Did you have a woman colleague who helped you become who you are today? This #WomensHistoryMonth, the Association for Computing Machinery encourages you to share their stories in posts to your social network of choice using the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode. The posts can include photos, descriptions, or personalized videos about these women.

If you have any questions or would like ACM to share your #SheIsWhyICode posts from its official social handles, please contact social@acm.org.

Download a PDF to share with your friends and colleagues.

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