SIGEcom Annual Report

July 2002 - June 2003
Submitted by: Michael Wellman, Chair SIGEcom

The major distinctive activities for SIGecom this fiscal year were two:

1. Held the Fourth ACM Conference on Electronic Commerce, June 2003, in San Diego in conjunction with FCRC. There was an extended gap from the last conference (Oct 01 in Tampa), due to the decision to change from Fall to Spring, and take a breather in the wake of Fall 2001 global events. The conference was successful, attracting close to 100 attendees, and running a small profit.

2. Installed the first elected slate of SIG officers. The Founding Chair, Stu Feldman, led a nomination process and stepped down as Chair. The new group is just coming up to speed on ACM procedures, and setting an agenda for the future of the SIG.

The only other significant service currently provided by the SIG is publication of the newsletter, SIGecom Exchanges. The newsletter is published quarterly in electronic format, and distributed to members and others. Exchanges has been produced most ably by the Founding Editor, Peter Wurman. Peter is seeking to step down after three years (in part due to assuming the position of SIGecom Secretary/Treasurer), so finding a successor is an important near-term task.

Our main challenge in the coming years is broadening and expanding the SIG and the Conference. The ACM EC Conference has already established itself as the premier venue for research at the intersection of game theory and computer science, as related to economics and commerce (e.g., auctions and mechanism design). This is clearly the source of excitement at our gatherings, and the focus of the most active SIG constituency. However, we all recognize that this is a relatively narrow slice of the field of E-Commerce, and for the long-term vitality of the SIG we need to cover a broader scope. Toward this end, we are co-locating EC-04 with the World-Wide Web Conference (WWW-04, in NYC in May). We have also selected conference officials with the aim of appealing to broader communities.

Awards:

Best Student Paper Award: Vangelis Markakis and Amin Saberi, Georgia Institute of Technology.

ACM Case Studies

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Edge Computing

ACM Queue’s “Research for Practice” is your number one resource for keeping up with emerging developments in the world of theory and applying them to the challenges you face on a daily basis. RfP consistently serves up expert-curated guides to the best of CS research, and relates these breakthroughs to the challenges that software engineers face every day. In this installment of RfP is by Nitesh Mor, a PhD candidate at UC Berkeley working on the next generation of globally distributed computer systems with a special focus on data security and privacy. Titled “Edge Computing,” this RfP gives an overview of some of the most exciting work being done in the area of computing infrastructures and applications. It provides an academic view of edge computing through samples of existing research whose applications will be highly relevant in the coming years.

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