SIGMICRO FY'04 Annual Report

July 2003 - June 2004
Submitted by: Kemal Ebcioglu, SIGMICRO Chair

The following are the highlights of SIGMICRO's activities during the fiscal year 2004.

SIGMICRO Conference Activities

SIGMICRO has been expanding its conference portfolio with new high quality conferences. We have gone from 1 conference (MICRO) to 4 conferences recently (MICRO, CASES, CGO, CF). Yet another new conference will soon become the fifth sponsored conference. Details about this new conference will be announced soon.

[MICRO-37]

SIGMICRO's flagship conference, the International Symposium on Microarchitecture (MICRO-37), will be held from December 4 to 8, 2004 in Portland, Oregon. (http://www.microarch.org/micro37). 158 papers were submitted (a record for MICRO) out of which 29 were accepted. The general chairs are Bob Colwell (Consultant) and Kevin Skadron (U. Virginia), and the PC chairs are Antonio Gonzales (UPC Barcelona), and John Shen (Intel). CGO 2004: SIGMICRO has been co-sponsoring a new conference, the Annual International Symposium on Code Generation and Optimization (CGO 2004, http://www.cgo.org), which was held very successfully, for the second time, from March 21 to 24, 2004 in Palo Alto, California. The program chair was Michael D. Smith (Harvard U.), and the general chair was Carole Dulong (Intel).

[CASES 2004]

SIGMICRO is co-sponsoring, for the second time, the International Conference on Compilers, Architecture and Synthesis on Embedded Systems (CASES 2004, http://www.casesconference.org), which will take place from September 23 to 25 in Washington D.C. The general co-chairs are Mary Jane-Irwin (Penn State) and Whei Zhao (TI), and the program committee co-chairs are Luciano Lavagno (Cadence) and Scott Mahlke (U. Michigan).

[Computing Frontiers]

SIGMICRO has launched another new international conference, Computing Frontiers (CF'04, http://www.computingfrontiers.org ), which was held in picturesque Ischia, Italy, from April 14 to 16, 2004. The conference focused on innovation and on leading edge interdisciplinary computing techniques. This year's program chairs were Jean Luc Gaudiot (UC Irvine, USA) and Vincenzo Piuri (U. of Milan, Italy) and the general chair was Stamatis Vassiliadis (U. of Delft, Netherlands). For CF'05 (which will be held next April, also in Ischia) the general chair will be Nader Bagherzadeh (UC Irvine), and the program chair will be Mateo Valero (UPC Barcelona).

New SIGMICRO Online Newsletter

The SIGMICRO newsletter has been restarted in an online form, with Erik Altman (IBM T.J. Watson Research Center) as the editor. In addition to normal online article content, the newsletter has a novel feature: the newsletter is organizing live e-seminars (telecon+softcopy slides) that the SIGMICRO community can listen in to, around the world, and can ask technical questions to the speaker.

Goals and Challenges

Our objectives for SIGMICRO continue to be:

1) Making quality improvements to the Annual International Symposium on Microarchitecture (MICRO), the flagship conference of SIGMICRO
2) Adding new high quality conferences to SIGMICRO's portfolio
3) Becoming a Web resource, for teaching and research fields related to microarchitecture
4) Establishing new student awards, to foster interest in leading edge microarchitecture research
5) Providing computing research resources to microarchitecture researchers worldwide, with the help of the industry.

We are continuing to make progress toward these goals. Please feel free to contact me with any questions or comments about SIGMICRO [kemal@watson.ibm.com].

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