ACM SGB Meeting Materials February 5, 2000

SIGGRAPH is having their 1st campfire. It's not quite a workshop. They will define an area, get 30 or so people together in the hope it will build into a small conference. 

SIGCPR sought strategies for developing interaction with folks that publish on your topic but don't have interest in collaborating with the SGIG. It was suggested that they invite them to the conference and place the program in other journals to build a name.

SIGGRAPH's student travel grants have been endowed. Their Chapters Chair continues to encourage the startup of SIGGRAPH Student Chapters.

SIGIR provides student travel grants.

SIGOPS has found it is not difficult to get money from corporations.

SIGARCH has been giving out student travel grants for some time. They recently decided that only SIGARCH student members would be eligible. The ISCA conference co-sponsored by SIGARCH has a traditional banquet and tends to be more costly than the student fee. For many years it was not included in student conference registration. SIGARCH is allowing members to pay for students to participate in the banquet.

SIGPLAN supports paying for students to go to their banquet.

SIGSOFT co-sponsors conferences with IEEE showing support for the community.

Prediction-Serving Systems

ACM Queue’s “Research for Practice” is your number one resource for keeping up with emerging developments in the world of theory and applying them to the challenges you face on a daily basis. In this installment, Dan Crankshaw and Joey Gonzalez provide an overview of machine learning server systems. What happens when we wish to actually deploy a machine learning model to production, and how do we serve predictions with high accuracy and high computational efficiency? Dan and Joey’s curated research selection presents cutting-edge techniques spanning database-level integration, video processing, and prediction middleware. Given the explosion of interest in machine learning and its increasing impact on seemingly every application vertical, it's possible that systems such as these will become as commonplace as relational databases are today. 

Why I Belong to ACM

Hear from Bryan Cantrill, vice president of engineering at Joyent, Ben Fried chief information officer at Google, and Theo Schlossnagle, OmniTI founder on why they are members of ACM.